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Oct. 3, 4pm – Rally to Save the Urban and Public Administration Program at the Graduate Center for Worker Education at 25 Broadway

Rally to Save the Urban and Public Administration Program at the Graduate Center for Worker Education at 25 Broadway 

Please Come to Protest and Rally to Save Our Prestigious Program 

Where: Brooklyn College Main Campus Gates 

@ Bedford Avenue, off Campus Road 

Directions: Take 2/5 to Flatbush Avenue/Brooklyn College or Take Q to Avenue, and walk eight blocks to Bedford and Campus Road 

Day: Thursday, October 3 from 4:00pm-7:00pm 

We are in this together and call on all students, graduates and faculty to attend the demonstration. We know you are busy, but please join us even for a brief time to urge Brooklyn College to hear our voices. 

Demands 1. Full restoration of the educational and support services available to students at the Downtown Manhattan campus of the Brooklyn College Graduate Center for Worker Education Program.

2. Extend the admissions deadline for fall to August 1st for fall and December 1 for spring, as other CUNY worker education programs. For a program to be open to working people, they must be able to make their own decision about when they are able to begin their graduate study.

3. Restore a full-time academic advisor to the Brooklyn College Graduate Center for Worker Education in lower Manhattan to assist students, guide them through the admissions process, advise them on their program, and help them to register, and career goals as is the practice in CUNY programs.

4. Assign an interim director to the Brooklyn College Graduate Center for Worker Education who is committed to sustaining a worker education program.

5. Conduct a full search for an equally committed permanent director. The student body must approve the individual finally chosen as director and be fully involved in all stages of the interview and selection process.

6. Restore the Brooklyn College Graduate Center for Worker Education’s full complement of activities; e.g. forums, conferences, etc.

7. Reinstate the quality faculty members who previously taught at the Center.

8. Provide a clear statement about how students will be able to take the necessary course work to fulfill the center’s graduation requirements despite the current dearth of options.

 

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Open Letter to Dear Dr. Karen Gould, President, Brooklyn College, CUNY

Dear Dr. Karen Gould, President, Brooklyn College, CUNY,

We are pleased to present you with this petition affirming this statement:

“Petition to Dr. Karen Gould, President, Brooklyn College, CUNY: Don’t jeopardize the incredible legacy Brooklyn College has in empowering New York City workers. Fully restore the Urban Policy & Administration and Health and Nutrition Studies programs at the Downtown Manhattan campus of the Brooklyn College Graduate Center for Worker Education. These programs are crucial for hard-working people of New York City, their families and diverse communities.

Demands:

1. Full restoration of the educational and support services available to students at the Downtown Manhattan campus of the Brooklyn College Graduate Center for Worker Education Program.

2. Extend the admissions deadline for fall to August 1st, as do other CUNY worker education programs.

3. Accept students for spring admission. For a program to be open to working people, they must be able to make their own decision about when they are able to begin their graduate study.

4. Restore a full-time academic advisor to the Brooklyn College Graduate Center for Worker Education in lower Manhattan to assist students, guide them through the admissions process, advise them on their program, and help them to register, as is the practice in all the other CUNY worker education programs.

5. Assign an interim director to the Brooklyn College Graduate Center for Worker Education who is committed to sustaining a worker education program.

6. Conduct a full search for an equally committed permanent director. The student body must approve the individual finally chosen as director and be fully involved in all stages of the interview and selection process.

7. Restore the Brooklyn College Graduate Center for Worker Education’s full complement of activities; e.g. forums, conferences, etc.

8. Reinstate the quality faculty members who previously taught at the center.

9. Provide a clear statement about how students will be able to take the necessary course work to fulfill the center’s graduation requirements despite the current dearth of options.

Attached is a list of individuals who have added their names to this petition, as well as additional comments written by the petition signers themselves.

Sincerely,

Committee of Concerned Students, Alumni, Faculty & Staff

Voices of Students and Graduates of the Graduate Center for Worker Education

by Kiiru Gichuru

    The master’s program at Brooklyn College’s Graduate Center for Worker Education helped this Kenyan immigrant to achieve his dream of a career in the law. In 2006, I enrolled in the program with a vague but idealistic notion that I wanted to find my role in changing the world. Thanks to this program I am now a recent law school graduate pursuing a career in labor law and labor advocacy.

    The Graduate Center for Worker Education made it possible for me to continue my education while serving as the Vice-President of my union, Local 1904.Its curriculum exposed me to different facets of policy ranging from domestic issues to foreign affairs. The program sharpened my instincts and gave me insight in how the policy process actually works and on how institutions and individuals relate to one another both on the domestic and international arenas.

     That strong background in policy allowed me to better understand how critical the law is in shaping policy that affects the lives of people. The Graduate Center for Worker Education equipped me with the skills necessary to understand the nuances and practices of urban policy and public administration.

      The program also trained me to be a broad-based analyst through complementary readings in International Organization, Political Development, Political and Administrative Problems in Newly Developed States, the U.S. Party System, and Policy Formulation in U.S. Government.

   Committed to a legal career as a labor advocate and eventually politics, the Center for Worker Education is responsible for shaping many of my political views today. My experience at the Graduate Center for Worker Education underscores the theme of my law school commencement speech, Ubuntu, an African word that embraces togetherness and encourages people to work together for the common good. For me, the Graduate Center for Worker Education represents more than an institution for higher learning, but a family of students, professors, and staff dedicated to improving the world we live in. Ubuntu!!!!

September 2013

 

by Sharitza Lopez-Rodriguez

 As a migrant from Puerto Rico and the first person in my family to graduate from college and to pursue a professional degree, my academic success has been life changing.  But it was by no means a guarantee.  As a full-time worker and single mother of a then 3-year-old, I had to make a careful decision of where I wanted to continue my academic endeavors. Accommodating my schedule, availability of support services and location were as important as program quality.  As an undergrad, I heard great things about the faculty, program dynamic, courses and academic enrichment that the Brooklyn College Graduate Center for Worker Education offered. I applied to enroll for the fall 2011 in the M.A, program in Political Science with a concentration in Urban Policy and Administration.

By the end of my first semester I knew I had made the right decision. I was academically challenged and looked forward to my classes even after a long day of work.  Though we met in the evening, the Graduate Center for Worker Education was still a campus where we could talk to faculty, a computer lab and the opportunity to interact with fellow students.

That all changed in my second semester during a “transition” that interrupted the program’s functions. The Center felt abandoned. No one was left whom we could see for advisement and registration. Class offerings were drastically reduced.  These changes were made without regard for the effect on the students.

Many of the students in this master’s program were “non-traditional” like me: many women and people of color, working full-time, often caring for children, struggling to earn a graduate degree, The Master’s program at the Graduate Center for Worker education gave a diverse student body of workers with family responsibilities access to higher education.  For me, that meant an opportunity for advancement in my career and upward mobility for me and my son.

As a graduate of the Graduate Center for Worker Education at Brooklyn College in June 2013 who will start law school in the fall, I cannot celebrate my achievement knowing that others who follow will not have the benefit of the supportive environment once offered at the Graduate Center for Worker Education at Brooklyn College.  That is why I am adding my voice in calling for its restoration.

August 2013

The Struggle at Brooklyn College – An Interview with Manny Ness

By Bill Fletcher, Jr.

Introduction:  For two years I taught as the Belle Zeller Visiting Professor in Political Science at Brooklyn College-City University of New York.  As part of my work, I taught a graduate class through Brooklyn College’s Graduate Center for Worker Education which is based in downtown Manhattan.  The program was targeted at adults, most of who worked, who sought to secure a graduate degree.  The student population was as fascinating as it was diverse.  They had varying experiences in the “real world.”  Some of these students were activists, but most were not.  They were working class New Yorkers who were not only trying to better themselves, but wished to involve themselves in a progressive academic environment.  It was an honor to have been associated with the program.

It was, therefore, with great distress that I began to hear rumors of efforts to deconstruct the program.  These efforts began with allegations against the head of the program, Professor Joseph Wilson, that were soon followed by what can only be described as a purge of the Center.  The Center soon became nothing more than a shell of its old self.

A struggle has unfolded aimed at saving the Graduate Center.  The following is an exchange with Professor Manny Ness who, for years, was attached to the Graduate Center.  I asked him to help us understand what has been transpiring at Brooklyn College as well as the broader implications.

******

Bill Fletcher:  There has been a crisis unfolding at the Graduate Center for Worker Education at Brooklyn College-City University of New York.  Please tell us about the nature of the crisis?  Also, why do you believe that anyone outside of Brooklyn College should be concerned about these events?
Manny Ness:  The crisis is the retrenchment and effort to close a landmark worker education program at Brooklyn College, the Graduate Center for Worker Education (GCWE).  For more than 30 years, the GCWE provided graduate education in the humanities and social sciences to working people, who went on to transmit their knowledge as leaders in trade unions, within under-served and impoverished communities, health care institutions, and through government service.  Crucially, many have gone on to work in the labor movement as educated and informed activists and trade unionists.

The attack against the GCWE is part of a broader offensive against the working class by the capital and the right wing.  Worker education programs are not considered income-generating institutions within the academy, but as a remnant of the workers, civil rights, and women’s movements.  What is alarming about the dismantling of the GCWE are the culprits who are avowed liberals in Brooklyn College and City University of New York (CUNY).  But as we know, today’s liberals are also supporters of free market and profit-driven solutions.  Some have used neo-liberal excuses: the former dean told an elected official that CUNY was seeking to eliminate redundancy.  This logic supported those who are simply ignorant of the program’s purpose: the interim director, a self-described labor activist, said the GCWE accepted too many students and wanted to create a labor research program.  In effect, the interim director sought to change the goals and mission of the program without any consultation.  For 30 years, the objective and mission of the GCWE has been to train working people in the humanities so they also may have the chance to influence society from the perspective of the working class. Indeed the interim director of the GCWE did not even know that the program he ran was intended to broaden knowledge in the humanities and social sciences to workers who would go on and serve unions and community groups.  As worker education programs are undermined by conservative and liberal opponents, civil society and our way of life is diminished as those in higher education seek to insulate their professions from the daily lives of the majority of people in the world.  Let’s face it: worker education programs in New York serve primarily working class people of color.

The Committee of Concerned Students, Alumni, Faculty and Staff to Save the GCWE, formed in the fall of 2012, is distressed that students who want to apply knowledge to create a better world will no longer have the same opportunity that their predecessors had; leading to the further evisceration of the labor movement in the USA.   I have heard many rumors that it is being replaced by a US State Department funded Iran democracy project, or, ultimately, an extension of Brooklyn College’s film school.

The defense committee believes that worker education is crucial to the development of an equitable and just society through developing and sharpening the intellectual skills to low-wage working people who only have time to attend evening classes.   For the past two centuries, under capitalism, the upper-class and elitists have always considered working people unworthy for the academy that has been dominated by the wealthy and the ‘gifted.’   As historian David Brody writes, business will always act like ‘beasts of the field.’   An educated worker is anathema to a plutocratic society.  Sociologist Joseph Schumpeter and his acolytes in the social sciences were comforted that anuneducated working class is a necessary bulwark against the creation of effective democratic institutions in society.  The GCWE was created as a means to educate working people and was organized in the tradition of the Workers’ Educational Association in the UK, Ruskin College at Oxford University and other programs established and guided by the opposing idea that cultivating worker-intellectuals is essential to promote an equitable society which provides knowledge to the majority who are denied access to ivory tower universities.

BF:  The attack against GCWE appears to be illustrative of a process unfolding all over the USA.  What makes the situation at Brooklyn College noteworthy?

MN:  As noted, the attack at Brooklyn College is taking place in the City University of New York, a liberal, ostensibly pro-labor redoubt for organized labor and center of public sector unionism.  New York City Mayor Bloomberg has first and foremost sought to destroy unions in the public sector: refusing to negotiate collective bargaining agreements, and thereby demoralize rank-and-file workers who are losing faith in feeble unions to which they pay dues, but less able than ever to provide members with wages and benefits of previous decades.  How different is New York State from Wisconsin?   New York has achieved budget cuts without the outcry and public debate in Wisconsin.  Leaders and activists within Occupy Wall Street, located in Zuccotti Park, just four blocks from the program, were drawn from Brooklyn College students and the GCWE ambit.  OWS helped sponsor public events at the program! Clearly we were doing something right.  Ironically, at the very same time, GCWE was under attack by CUNY.

Like many other worker education programs, government and university administrators cut budgets year after year without public debate and public discussion.   By making a scapegoat out of the administrator who tried to keep the Graduate Center for Worker Education afloat for more than a decade by following directives to generate revenues while budgets were cut, the entire program was destroyed.  In any department, college and university, there are internal personal divisions, but the attack and dismantling of the GCWE rises to a new level, where an entire program is dismembered.  As noted, what’s telling is that the Brooklyn College Dean even told New York State Assemblyman Joe Lentol that the program was under scrutiny in an effort to “look to eliminate redundancies.”  Those in urban liberal locations who believe they are immune to the assault against organized labor and racial equality are closing their eyes to the hypocrisy of  elected officials and university administrators who are opposed to labor unions and who seek to reduce access to university education to people of color.   We need to be more attentive as other programs are surely on the chopping block in New York and throughout the USA.

BF:  There are those who take issue with your analysis and suggest that the Graduate Center was not doing the sort of work that it needed to do; that it did not have a relationship with the local labor movement; and that it mishandled resources.  What do you say in response to such allegations?

MN:   The ad hominem attack by some members of my own department and their supporters against the Graduate Center has been already disproved.  The allegations are baseless and cannot survive the light of day.  The program, among other things, has helped to promote a new generation of trade unionists, many of whom come out of the public sector.   As to whether there were problems in the program, certainly any program can be improved with greater resources.  One must keep in mind that the program ran with only one full-time staff person, and it was a success, as faculty and staff were a constant presence, even if unpaid.  We know it is easy to destroy a program and then say it doesn’t work.   In effect, that’s precisely what the interim director did.  Admissions were halted and then severely restricted, effectively destroying a vibrant program that served students and graduates alike.  All public programs were cancelled aside from the Labor and Working Class History Association conference, drawing 600 labor activists and scholars.  The interim director who launched the attack against the very program he presided over, did not even realize that he was overseeing a worker education program intended to educate union members and future leaders in urban and government relations, public policy, and the political process and to go on to rebuild the workers movement.   Instead, he thought the program was a labor education program, akin to the National Labor College, where graduates were trained in union organizing, collective bargaining, labor-management relations, and pension fund administration.  But even labor education programs have classes in history, social sciences, and public policy.

So far as mismanagement of resources, in the first place, there were very few resources.  In these times of neoliberal privatization, public universities are forcing programs to raise money through outside sources.  While I have no knowledge of mismanagement, I remember that the program did a lot with few resources.   The Graduate Center sponsored events and national conferences for which it had to raise funds, this because the program was under assault.   I am proud that the Consortium for Worker Education helped sponsor the Labor and Working Class History Association, which burnished the image of a withering worker education program.   Not once was a public discussion held on the future of the GCWE.  As a faculty member, I was not consulted even once about the fate of the program.  I believe that those who have positions of authority in public institutions hold the responsibility and duty to share their plans with faculty.  Not once were faculty members notified of any plans.

Sometimes academics forget that their main responsibility is to ensure the education of students.  In my view the actual malfeasance is the revisionist history that was shaped by those who were ignorant of the program.   The question that many wonder is what type of institution is CUNY: to most observers, attention is directed at elite programs and schools that generate income from the private sphere.  That’s precisely what corporations do: focus resources where they can extract the most income and turn a huge profit.  Stewardship over the academy is not about profits but education.  The malfeasance began with the reduction of resources by state and city officials.  Those administrators who are presiding over the program’s dismantling are only the most recent chapter in this tragic situation.  It is my hope that those CUNY administrators who recognize the significance of worker education will do the right thing and restore this highly respected program.

BF:  Thank you very much.

Saving Worker Education!

The Graduate Center for Worker Education was a beacon of hope and ascendency for working class students seeking intellectual challenges, social advocacy and professional advancement. So I was shocked and dismayed to learn about the closing of the GCWE by Brooklyn College President Karen Gould, following a stream of attacks against the Center’s working students, faculty, and staff. 

By Gerald Horne, Portside

Brooklyn College’s Graduate Center for Worker Education has a rich institutional legacy of seminal scholarship, outstanding teaching and a long list of students who have become leaders in unions, politics, law and social policy advocacy. Founded with municipal union support, and with a pro-labor CUNY Chancellor Joe Murphy,  the Center maintained relations with, and provided higher educational access for hundreds of members of local 1199 SEIU, Teamsters, Communication Workers of America,  United Automobile Workers, American Federation of Teachers,  among others.
So I was shocked and dismayed to learn about the closing of the GCWE by Brooklyn College President Karen Gould, following a stream of attacks against the Center’s working students, faculty, and staff.  I was visiting Belle Zeller Professor of Political Science at Brooklyn College a decade ago and devoted most of my teaching to the Graduate Center for Worker Education. Therefore, I’m intimately familiar with the program, the talented faculty, dedicated staff and remarkable graduate students, drawn from New York’s municipal labor unions and immigrant communities.  The GCWE was a beacon of hope and ascendency for working class students seeking intellectual challenges, social advocacy and professional advancement.
My experience teaching at the Center, as a visiting Belle Zeller Professor, was pedagogically rewarding. My GCWE students were highly motivated,  focused and compared favorably to the brightest students I have taught over the years. The worker education students were mainly women of color, most with full-time jobs Many students were active or became active in the labor movement, community organizations, electoral politics, and went on to doctoral and law programs. Many have established prestigious careers and academic accomplishments.
The GCWE lays claim to  many distinguished faculty. Among them are public intellectuals who play a significant role in public policy and includes judges, city planners and public  health experts. The GCWE’s faculty has always compared favorably to those from the top universities in the world, on the basis of teaching, publications, and public service.  Their support and dedication to students is second to none.
GCWE  was always uniquely characterized by its outstanding faculty of color, which offered students access to leaders who have distinguished themselves as scholars, journalists, leaders, and beyond. No program in CUNY, and perhaps in the entire nation, has a better track record in hiring underrepresented faculty including  African American, Afro-Caribbean, Latina/o, and Asian faculty.  They include:
  • Gena Rae ‘McNeil: distinguished historian, University of North Carolina;
  • Stanley Nelson, MacArther Fellow, award winning  documentary  Filmmaker (The Murder of Emmett Till, nationally broadcast );
  • Gary Younge, author and distinguished journalist, The Guardian and The Nation;
  • Gregory Wilpert, internationally renowned Latin American social scientist;
  • Lisette Nieves, Rhodes Scholar, Co-chair appointed by President Obama, to the National  Commission  on Hispanics in Higher Education;
  • Juan Gonzalez, award winning journalist, author and co-host of  Democracy Now!;
  • Warren Whitlock, national director, civil rights, United States Department of Transportation;
  • David Addams, esq. former director, New York Civil Liberties Union, former president, National Conference of Black Lawyers;
  • Saru Jayaraman author,  labor activist and founder of ROC New York;
  • Bill Fletcher, author, labor educator and civil rights leader;
  • Archibald Singham, author and founder of the global non-aligned movement;
  • Dominick Tuminaro, labor law professor, former Deputy Attorney General for Civil Rights in New York, and member of an underrepresented CUNY population, to name a few.
As recently as 2009 I participated in the GCWE’s national conference, Black Women and the Radical Agenda, featuring Angela Davis, Manning Marable, Leith Mullings, Esther Jackson, Carole Boyce Davies, and Eric McDuffie, highlighting the monumental work of freedom fighter Charlene Mitchell . Hundreds of scholars from around the world and across the nation participated in this historic conference. The journal New Solutions recently held its national conference at GCWE, as did the Labor And Working Class History Association. In 2011 the Worker’s Center hosted my double book launch at a well attended public event. Numerous rank-and-file labor conferences have be held at GCWE.
GCWE was a focus of institutional and social transformation. As a hotbed for developing social activists, raising the minimum wage, fighting for and enabling organizing restaurant workers, publishing ground breaking academic studies like Immanuel Ness’s International Encyclopedia of Revolution and Protest, and his peer-reviewed journal Working USA: The Journal of Labor and Society, the GCWE manifested a rare combination that conferred students with historical analysis, critical social and political theory, and applied policy practice, empowering generations of  leaders engaged in social transformation. Unmistakably, Worker education flourished under the Center’s former director, Professor Joseph Wilson.
From Oxford to Moscow, from Los Angeles to New York, worker education programs are under attack by the right wing and zealots who believe working people should not have access to higher education.    The attacks takes various form, from defunding budgets and shrinking programs to outright closure, as is the case with CUNY’s GCWE.
Without worker education programs, social movements, from trade unions to Occupy Wall Street are deprived of a vital resources to analyze and critique society and develop advocates to help build a better world for working people.
Based on dismissive public pronouncements lacking a substantive rational, B.C.’s  President Gould took a sudden wrecking ball to the GCWE.  A powerful institutional voice against racism has been silenced . Let us hope and fight to make sure this dastardly act is reversed. Dismantling the GCWE and public statements by the interim director and administration cast a shadow of disdain over the many distinguished faculty and outstanding students  in the GCWE’s extended community. I have come to find out from former employees  that these allegations and unethical attacks are over two years old. Significantly, no findings of wrongdoing have been substantiated, refuting all McCarthy-like claims to the contrary.
It appears to me, based on publicly available information, that the Constitutional rights  of the GCWE’s  faculty and staff have been trampled upon, such as the presumption of innocence,  the right to face ones accusers, freedom of association, due process, etc. The  attack and closing raises troubling issues of the academic integrity and ethics of the accusers.
Given the long history of political persecution in the academy, and the history of false charges and persecution in the nation as a whole,  from the frame-up of Angela Davis, to the dirty tricks played by the FBI against Dr. King, Malcolm X,  Paul Robeson,  the Black Panthers, WEB DuBois, and labor leaders to numerous to count, those who would be swayed by broad brush accusations should also recall egregious prosecutorial errors  littering the landscape of US political history. After all, should these charges fall on their face, as they seem to be unraveling after 2 years, who will apologize  to the students, staff and faculty victimized by this unethical attack?  How can reputations be repaired? Why would  an institution be dismantled for the mere alleged and unproven sins of the former director? Who will rebuild the Center and repair the reputations of students, staff and alumni? Obviously those who would attack worker education are not hindered  by class consciousness, racial justice or common ethics.
Tragically, if we allow the unjustified closing of this venerated program that serves working people of color, organized labor and immigrant communities, we can expect that other similarly oriented programs will face the same fate.
As CUNY’s flagship MA program for working people, and as one of New York’s City’s most venerable working class institutions, it is in the public interest to save the Graduate Center for Worker Education. That’s why I signed the petition to save the program. I am encouraging all progressives, trade unionists, those fighting for racial and class justice and public interest policy advocates to urgently do the same.
Please sign this petition and forward to friends: Click here: http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/save-brooklyn-college?source=c.em.cp&r_…
[Dr. Horne holds the John J. and Rebecca Moores Chair of History and African American Studies. His research has addressed issues of racism in a variety of relations involving labor, politics, civil rights, international relations and war. He has also written extensively about the film industry. Dr. Horne received his Ph.D. in history from Columbia University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley and his B.A. from Princeton University. Teaching
Dr. Horne’s undergraduate courses include the Civil Rights Movement and U.S. History through Film. He also teaches graduate courses in Diplomatic History, Labor History and 20th Century African American History.  He is the author of more than thirty books and one hundred scholarly articles and reviews. His current research focuses on a variety of topics such as a revising of the traditional understanding of 1776 and viewing the arrival of the Cuban Revolution in 1959 as a response to Jim Crow imposed with the arrival of the U. S. as the dominant force on the island in 1898.]

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